fortified food

fortified food

Any food (e.g., a cereal) that has essential nutrients (e.g., iron and vitamins) added, either in quantities greater than those present normally (supplementation) or which are not normally present in the food being fortified (fortification).
References in periodicals archive ?
Sales of fortified food products grew to $5.5 billion in 1999, a 54 percent increase from 1998 and double 1995's sales of $2.4 billion, according to Kalorama Information.
Supplements and fortified food can add up to high intakes for certain nutrients, King says, and there may be only a narrow range of tolerance for those substances.
However, if you're over 50, get the Recommended Dietary Allowance (2.4 meg a day) of B-12 from a fortified food (like cereal) or a supplement.
The report highlights the growing regulatory chaos created by the rapidly-expanding dietary supplements and fortified food markets, and underlines the fact that the Directives proposed by the Comission will only address a fraction of the problem.
Imagine the perfect omega-3 world: fortified food products that can be consumed every day to provide the proper amount of omega-3 fatty acids in a consumer's diet.
Some of the steps include ready to use fortified food for breast feeding mothers and pregnant women; food for work schemes; livelihood initiatives for improved access to food; nutrition specific and sensitive interventions; ready to use fortified food supplementation, fortification and biofortifications and feeding programs for infants and young children.
What's more, if you get vitamin B-12 in a supplement or a fortified food like some breakfast cereals, you're less likely to be deficient.
What to do: If you're 50 or older, get at least 2.4 micrograms a day of vitamin B-12 from a multivitamin or fortified food. (That form of B-12 is better absorbed than the B-12 that occurs naturally in food.) A B-12 deficiency used to show up in older people as anemia,
A particularly good fortified food to choose is calcium and D-fortified orange juice, which provides the vitamin C and potassium bones need as well.
It's best not to try to get all your calcium needs in one dose of any fortified food or pill.
People older than 50 may lack the stomach acid needed to extract B-12 from food, so they should get at least 2.4 mcg a day from a supplement or fortified food like breakfast cereal.
To reduce the risk of having a child with spina bifida or similar birth defects, anyone capable of becoming pregnant should get 100 percent of the Daily Value (400 micrograms) of folic acid from a fortified food or supplement.