fortified milk


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milk

 [milk]
1. a nutrient fluid produced by the mammary gland of many animals for nourishment of young mammals.
2. a liquid (emulsion or suspension) resembling the secretion of the mammary gland.
acidophilus milk milk fermented with cultures of Lactobacillus acidophilus; used in gastrointestinal disorders to modify the bacterial flora of the intestinal tract.
milk-alkali syndrome ingestion of milk and absorbable alkali in excess amounts, resulting in kidney damage and elevated blood calcium levels.
casein milk a prepared milk containing very little salt or sugar and a large amount of fat and casein.
condensed milk milk that has been partly evaporated and sweetened with sugar.
dialyzed milk milk from which the sugar has been removed by dialysis through a parchment membrane.
evaporated milk milk prepared by evaporation of half of its water content.
milk fever an endemic fever said to be due to the use of unwholesome cow's milk.
fortified milk milk made more nutritious by addition of milk protein, vitamin A, or vitamin D.
homogenized milk milk treated so the fats form a permanent emulsion and the cream does not separate.
milk of magnesia a suspension of magnesium hydroxide, used as an antacid and laxative.
modified milk cow's milk made to correspond to the composition of human milk.
protein milk milk modified to have a relatively low content of carbohydrate and fat and a relatively high protein content.
witch's milk milk secreted in the breast of a newborn infant.

for·ti·fied milk

milk to which some essential nutrient, usually vitamin D, has been added.

fortified milk

Public health
Milk with added vitamin D, usually 400 IU of vitamin D3/quart (0.94 L); there is little consistency in the amount of vitamin D that is actually added.
 
In the US and Canada, only 20% of milk purchased contains 80–120% of stated vitamin D; the remainder is either low (or even absent), increasing the risk of rickets, or too high (up to 3- to 9-fold greater than stated vitamin D content), thus carrying a risk of toxicity.

for·ti·fied milk

(fōrti-fīd milk)
Milk to which some essential nutrient, usually vitamin D, has been added.

for·ti·fied milk

(fōrti-fīd milk)
Milk to which some essential nutrient, usually vitamin D, has been added.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eligible subjects were divided into three groups, normal (NO), underweight (UW), and severely underweight (SU), and then randomized to either nonfortified milk group or fortified milk group using opaque sealed envelopes.
Fortified milk (FM) group showed significantly decreased serum iron (pless than 0.003) as compared with controls whereas serum ferritin and red cell folate values showed insignificant change (p=0.25 and p=0.85 respectively).
Fat content of fortified milk for various treatments showed non-significant effect.
Dubai Consumption of fortified milk alone is insufficient to fight the shockingly low levels of Vitamin D3 in the UAE population, an Abu Dhabi-based scientist and pioneering researcher on Vitamin D3 has warned.
The primary dietary source of vitamin D is fortified milk and orange juice.
* Eggs, pork, and foods made with fortified milk, such as cheeses, also contain vitamin D, but don't overlook the calories, fat and cholesterol some of these foods can add to your diet.
"Fortified milk is an important source of vitamin D for many North Americans, and current and accurate data is important to the assessment of vitamin D intake throughout the population," says Exler.
Vitamin D increases calcium absorption in the bloodstream and in addition to sun exposure can be obtained from fortified milk, fatty fish and eggs.
If a patient is concerned beyond this, drinking fortified milk or fruit juices will help,'" Dr.
Last year, the Society joined American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA) Milk for preschoolers program, which provided the preschoolers fortified milk and biscuits every day of the school term.
In addition, a higher incidence of lactose intolerance among blacks, which can eliminate vitamin-D fortified milk from the diet, contributes to lower dietary intake, previous research has shown.
Researchers assigned 180 men, ages 50-79, to doing aerobic and strengthening exercises three days a week, drinking about 13 1/2 ounces of fortified milk (providing 1,000 mg calcium and 800 international units [IU] of vitamin D) a day, doing both, or doing nothing.